Hawaiki ancestral polynesia an essay in historical anthropology

About this product Synopsis In this innovative book, Kirch and Green develop the theory and method of an anthropological approach to long-term history. Combining archaeology, comparative ethnography, and historical linguistics, they advance a phylogenetic model for cultural diversification, and apply a triangulation method for historical reconstruction. Through an analysis of the history of Polynesian cultures they present a first-time detailed reconstruction of Hawaiki, the Ancestral Polynesian culture that flourished some 2, years ago.

Hawaiki ancestral polynesia an essay in historical anthropology

This page intentionally left blank Hawaiki, Ancestral Polynesia An Essay in Historical Anthropology The power of an anthropological approach to long-term history lies in its unique ability to combine diverse evidence, from archaeological artifacts to ethnographic texts and comparative word lists.

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In this innovative book, Kirch and Green explicitly develop the theoretical underpinnings, as well as the particular methods, for such a historical anthropology.

Hearst Museum, at the University of California at Berkeley.

Hawaiki ancestral polynesia an essay in historical anthropology

Staley Prize in Anthropology. Subject to statutory exception and to the provision of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

The proposition seemed straightforward enough. Its writing has occupied far longer than anticipated, requiring several international trips and much longdistance collaboration.

Hawaiki ancestral polynesia an essay in historical anthropology

Yet we do not regret the transformation that our project has undergone, because out of it we have gained a deeper respect for the possibilities of a truly integrative historical anthropology.

Green early on incorporated historical linguistics into his models of Polynesian settlement e. As with our predecessors, we likewise have spent much time residing and working in many Polynesian societies, including: All this, need we say, has been in addition to our primary efforts as archaeologists in the same islands, where we have endeavored to generate materially documented historical sequences of cultural change.

We underscore this point here not to assert our authority, but rather to stress the necessity in historical anthropology of erudition based on broad comparative knowledge.

Writing this book has been a true collaboration. But one of us writes books, having honed the necessary skills, while the other does not; the order of authors recognizes that reality. Acknowledgments Green thanks the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science, University of California at Berkeley, for a Visiting Miller Professorship which brought him to Berkeley in the fall ofand allowed us to begin our collaboration.

Professor Biggs gave us free access to his computerized database, for which we are immensely grateful. Other linguists, especially Andrew Pawley, Malcolm Ross, Ross Clark, and Bob Blust, have provided us with information, insights, and helpful critiques over the years. We are especially grateful to the following colleagues who took the time to read and critique draft versions of various chapters: Hans Schmidt kindly provided us with his transcriptions, in English and Rotuman, of selected excerpts from the manuscript notes of A.

Hocart, housed in the Alexander Turnbull Library. Joan Lawrence prepared the illustrations from our rough copy.

Patrick Vinton Kirch Roger C. Eighty years ago Edward Sapir advanced a charter for historical anthropology in his short monograph on Time Perspective in Aboriginal American Culture: A Study in Method Sapir Sapir's ethnolinguistic bias is understandable, given the embryonic state of New Prologue: Even for the Old World, where archaeology had an earlier start, existing knowledge was then encompassed within the boldest of schemes: Although the direct historical approach fell out of favor in the post-World War II era, it now shows signs of renewed application Lightfoot The New Archaeology of the s and s replaced the earlier emphasis on homologous change with a concern for analogous change, driven in part by a paradigm of archaeology as an experimental and even predictive social science e.

Anthropological linguistics, in contrast, has always retained to varying degrees its historical component Hock Finally, like linguistics, biological anthropology has long maintained its evolutionary interests in the genetic history of human populations.

Renewed efforts at tackling sequences of homologous change are noted by Trigger as recurring in the late s and early s in North America, the Mayan region, and Polynesia, as well as in Africa. Other recent examples include the collaborative works of Kent Flannery and Joyce Marcus ; Marcus and Flannery on the long-term historical evolution of the Zapotec and Mixtec peoples of Mesoamerica, and Kirch and Sahlins' collaborative work on the Hawaiian Kingdom Throughout the s some sociocultural anthropologists became increasingly historicized Ohnuki-Tierney The pioneering efforts of Sahlins and Dening have been extended by others e.

To historical anthropology is thus transferred the theoretical commissions of the discipline: The Anthropology of History in the Kingdom of Hawaii Thus turning their backs to archaeological colleagues often housed in the very same academic departments of anthropology, historical ethnographers have often haughtily disdained anything except the documentary form of the literate world's historical texts, usually European-authored.

In such agendas, the archaeological record is assumed to be either irrelevant to history, or relevant only to a short segment of it. Also damaging to the effort to develop a historical ethnography has been the postmodernist critique in anthropology e.

With respect to linguistics, we detect a renewed and more weighty interest in the intersection of its disciplinary contribution to the historical concerns among the various subdisciplines of anthropology.

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An example from the s, notable for its methodological rigor, is Dyen and Aberle's reconstruction of Proto Athapaskan kinship systems. A return to an interest in linguistics and archaeology is evident as one major theme selected for the World Archaeology Congress, stimulated in part by provocative ideas of Colin Renfrew, on the spread of Indo-European Blench and Spriggs In his extensive writings leading toward the reconstruction of the Proto Austronesian lexicon, Blust e.

Some of these trends in the study of the Austronesian language family and culture history are reviewed by Pawley and Ross Add tags for "Hawaiki, ancestral Polynesia: an essay in historical anthropology".

Be the first. rutadeltambor.com: Hawaiki, Ancestral Polynesia: An Essay in Historical Anthropology (): Patrick Vinton Kirch, Roger C. Green: Books. Hawaiki, Ancestral Polynesia An Essay in Historical Anthropology The power of an anthropological approach to long-term history lies in its unique ability to combine diverse evidence, from archaeological artifacts to ethnographic texts and comparative word lists.

Hawaiki, Ancestral Polynesia: An Essay in Historical Anthropology, Paperback by Kirch, Patrick Vinton; Green, Roger Curtis, ISBN X, ISBN An anthropological approach to long-term history through detailed reconstruction of the Ancestral Polynesian culture, Hawaiki.

Hawaiian children are publicly educated under the same terms as any other children in the United States. In Hawaii, native Hawaiians are publicly educated by the Hawaiʻi State Department of Education, an ethnically diverse school system that is the United States' largest and most centralized.

Mar 14,  · In this innovative book, Kirch and Green develop the theory and method of an anthropological approach to long-term history. Combining archaeology, comparative ethnography, and historical linguistics, they advance a phylogenetic model for cultural diversification, and apply a triangulation method for historical reconstruction/5(5).

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